Drizzle Oil and Vinegar

Drizzle Oil and Vinegar

Oil drizzlers made of glass

Tuesday, February 05th, 2008 1:46pm

Oil drizzlers come in many different forms and manufactured material. It is important to know what type of material is best for decanting olive oil and vinegar.

Due to their acidity, all vinegars are have varying levels of corrosiveness. Because of this, vinegar should be stored and dispensed from ceramic, glass or stainless steel containers. When sealing containers, use a cork or stopper that will not break down or corrode. Containers made from other metals, such as aluminum, chrome and copper should not be used. China produces a vast range of cheap stoppers and spouts, but most have a chrome or metallic finish, which begin to dissolve when exposed to vinegar.

Known for both its corrosive resistant and hygienic properties, glass containers are perfect storage vessels for both oil and vinegar. Our glass oil drizzlers are made from laboratory grade borosilicate Simax glass and hand blown to ensure both uniqueness and quality. Similar to kitchen Pyrex™, this particular glass is extremely durable, and because our oil drizzlers are hand blown, they are also elegant. When exposed to vinegar, glass oil drizzlers exhibit no corrosion, and both the glass vessel and spouts can be cleaned simply with hot water and dish soap.

The best oil drizzlers are composed entirely of glass. Oil drizzlers consisting of a glass pour spout and body is considered a two-piece cruet. A friction fit means that the glass pour spout ensures that the cruet is non drip, sparing you from any stains and mess often associated with other containers. The flared neck of the glass body acts as an integral funnel that can be used for filling the cruet. The spout contains a built in vent which provides pressure equalization, making dispension of your chosen liquid a precision task with no effort required.

Designed to provide a thin drizzle of oil or vinegar, our oil drizzlers are ideal for cooking and serving purposes. Cruets.com oil drizzlers can hold up to six fluid ounces and are dishwasher safe.

drizzle oil, oil drizzlers 


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Italian Bread Dip

Friday, March 14th, 2008 9:14pm

bread dipping recipeIngredients
1 Tablespoon Minced Fresh Basil
1 Tablespoon Minced Fresh Parsley (Italian Best)
1 Tablespoon Fresh Minced Garlic
1 Teaspoon Thyme
1 Teaspoon Oregano
1 Teaspoon Black Pepper
1/2 Teaspoon Minced Fresh Rosemary
1/2 Teaspoon Kosher Salt
1/4 Teaspoon Crushed Red Pepper Fakes
1/2 Cup Olive Oil
1/8 Teaspoon Fresh Lemon Juice


Place all the ingredients except the olive oil and lemon juice in a small blender or similar appliance and blend until the ingredients are all roughly the same size. In a separate bowl, add the olive oil and lemon juice and mix them well. Add 1 ½ teaspoons of mixed herbs for every 4 tablespoons of olive oil mixture and serve in olive oil dipping dishes.

Dip warm bread in the sauce and enjoy.

Italian Bread Dip Recipe, bread dipping spices 

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A new dipping dish

Tuesday, February 05th, 2008 1:17pm

Drizzle olive oil over fresh baked Italian bread or use a newly designed dipping dish – White American Stoneware bread dipping dish. For an ideal Italian appetizer, drizzle your favorite oil in the olive oil dipping dish and then dip fresh bread or vegetables into the oil. A bread dipping dish set is a wonderful culinary gift for any occasion. When the oil is added to the dipping dish, unique green tones will filter through, providing a wonderful visual presentation on the table for serving.

Bread Dipping in Olive Oil

Saturday, March 01st, 2008 6:49pm

Dipping bread in olive oil is a wonderful and delicious way to indulge in something that is actually good for you and can prevent the onset of coronary disease according to a report released by the American Heart Association.

Try bread dipping as an alternative to other less healthy appetizers. Bread dipping is essentially a Mediterranean practice whereby the texture and flavour of vegetables and bread are enhanced by dipping them into extra virgin olive oil. Bread dipping is enjoyed as a pre cursor to a meal of simply on its own.

Extra virgin olive oil alone is an ideal dip for bread but you may wish to experiment by adding subtle or intense flavours to your oil. Dried herbs and exotic seasoning can be used to create a dip that will excite your  taste buds. Use your favorite ingredients and your imagination.

Once you have made your extra virgin olive oil dip the possibilities for its use are endless! For example, pasta or a crisp salad can be transformed from the ordinary to the extraordinary when tossed in your unique dipping sauce. Or, simply pour over fresh steamed vegetables. And, don’t forget, all  types of meat can be infused with exciting flavours when left to stand in your dipping sauce prior to cooking.

Extra virgin olive oil is perfect for dipping sauces and should be the only type of oil used for this purpose. It is more expensive than virgin olive oil because of its rich flavour and the method used to extract the oil from the olive, but there is really no alternative as any connoisseur of olive oil will tell you. The flavour speaks for itself.

Dipping sauces are so simple to prepare and versatile to use. These sauces can be created and bottled in advance. If you have a hungry family or unexpected guests you will always be able to create a fantastic meal in no time at all! And, if you really want to impress add some cubed bread to some of your dipping sauces and enjoy the results.

If you haven’t made any dipping sauces in advance just add your choice of seasoning and herbs to your extra virgin olive oil and heat for a few seconds to allow the flavours to permeate the oil. However, because of the superb quality and flavour of extra virgin olive oil it can be served as it is ‘au natural’ with your choice of accompaniments.

It is easy to see why bread dipping in olive oil has become so popular. It’s fast and easy to prepare, good for your heart and a delight to serve at any time. 

bread dipping olive oil, olive oil bread 


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Olive Focaccia

Wednesday, March 19th, 2008 8:29pm

Olive Focaccia Bread

A great thing about this dough is that you can make it, let it rise, shape it and bake it. Or, you can make the dough several hours in advance, even the day before and let it rise in the refrigerator. It just depends when you want to bake it. By putting the dough in the fridge, you can come back to it when you want. Cold dough is also easier to work with.

2 cups warm water
1 package dry yeast (2-1/4 t.)
1 cup flour
4 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon dried tarragon
1 teaspoon dried rosemary (crush it in the palm of your hand)
2 teaspoons salt
4 to 4-1/2 cups flour
4 tablespoons olive paste
olive oil for brushing
yellow cornmeal for dusting

Whisk together the water, yeast, and 1 cup of flour until smooth. Combine the oil, tarragon, rosemary, and salt. Add 4 cups of flour, stirring until the dough is too thick to stir. Then place the dough onto the countertop and knead for about 10 minutes or until the dough is moist but not sticky. You may need to use a little more or a little less flour to obtain the right consistency. Drizzle over a few drops of oil, place the dough back into the bowl and cover. Allow the dough to rise until it has doubled in size. This should take at least an hour or the dough can be allowed to ferment over night.

When you’re ready to bake the bread, heat the oven to 400 degrees. Dust the countertop with flour and turn the dough onto counter. Press out the dough. Spread the olive paste on one side leaving a bit of uncovered dough on the edges. Fold the dough in half and press the edges together.

Use a rolling pin to roll the dough to the size of your baking sheet. This must be done with care to avoid the paste oozing out. If any olive paste does come out, set it aside.

Brush your baking sheet with olive oil and dust with cornmeal. Place the dough on the cornmeal. Spread any olive past on top that has been set aside. Brush with olive oil and sprinkle with cornmeal. Place on the stove top to rise. After the dough has risen, approximately 20 minutes, bake for 30 minutes or until
golden brown.

olive focaccia bread


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Italian Eggs With Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Tuesday, October 07th, 2014 2:19pm

• Four eggs
• Four slices buttered toast
• Four tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
• One and one quarter teaspoons salt
• One quarter cup canned tomato sauce
• One quarter cup chopped onions
• One quarter cup dry white wine
• One quarter pound chicken livers
• One quarter teaspoon basil
• One quarter teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
• One tablespoon parsley

Wash the chicken livers very well and then slice each piece in two. In a saucepan pour in the olive oil and begin to heat on a medium setting. Place the onions in and sauté them for five minutes. Then place the chicken liver pieces in and cook for another five minutes while frequently mixing them together with the onions. Then put in the wine, basil, tomato sauce, pepper and salt. Let it begin to boil and then return to low heat for another five minutes. Crack open the eggs and let fall into the pan, then cover the pan and let cook for three more minutes. Place an egg per slice of bread and then coat with the sauce and sprinkle to taste with parsley. Serves three.

Fish And Shrimp With Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Friday, October 03rd, 2014 10:21am

One of the keys to the Mediterranean Diet is olive oil, and another is fresh seafood. Extra virgin olive oil is great with fish. There are many Italian seafood recipes that use extra virgin olive oil on the fish. EVOO is also excellent to use as a non stick oil to cook with. Even better, a mixture of butter and extra virgin olive oil can be the difference to a tasty treat of shrimp. Italy is a country with a very long coastline, and the variety and selection of fish sometimes appears limitless. On the west coast, the region from Genoa down to Naples, the fish are of the Mediterranean type, full of a strong sea-flavor. On the east coast, from Venice down to Bari, Italy fronts on the Adriatic and it is from this extraordinary body of water that some of the most delicate fish and shellfish in the world may be found.

From the Adriatic come scampi, a type of shrimp or prawn. Scampi are actually a distinct and separate variety of shellfish, although by some error, it has come to mean broiled shrimp prepared in garlic and olive oil. Nevertheless, Italian scampi are undoubtedly the finest shrimp in the world. Although American shrimp are excellent, scampi are absolutely incomparable and for this reason, Italian fish dishes are somewhat unusual to most Americans, who are accustomed to eating merely broiled or fried fish.

Porcini Mushrooms With Pasta And Olive Oil

Thursday, April 03rd, 2014 9:42am

The best porcini mushrooms are probably found in Parma, and this recipe is inspired by this Italian city. These mushrooms absorb a particular acid called tanino and they usually grow under the chestnut trees. Even though these mushrooms have a special nutty flavor that makes any dish distinctive, the best time to collect them will be in the fall months.

The estimated preparation time would be twenty minutes and here is what you need for the sauce:

  • One half cup of olive oil
  • One half cup of Parmesan or pecorino cheese
  • One cup dry porcini mushrooms
  • One cup of tomato sauce
  • Three cups of chicken broth
  • Three cups of chicken broth
  • Three quarters of a pound fresh tagliatelle or fettucine pasta
  • Three tablespoons of Italian pancetta arrotolata
  • Two peeled shallots that are chopped fine
  • Salt

Boil salted water into a large pot. You will need to soak porcini in chicken broth for about a quarter of an hour to start preparing the sauce. However, avoid soaking the sauce. The next step would be to sauté shallots until you obtain a golden color while heating the olive oil in a medium-sized skillet. Add pancetta to this combination. Drain the oil when you obtain a golden color. Mix the tomato sauce with the porcini and add the mixture to the skillet. Simmer the mixture until the sauce is on the thick side. Cover the pot to keep it warm. The next step would be to add the fetuccini or tagliatelle to the boiling water. Server the recipe with porcini sauce and grated cheese when al dente. Serves four.

Mediterranean Diet Healthy Food Ideas With Olive Oil

Friday, March 07th, 2014 1:21pm

While a busy day calls for a quick meal, it does not call for a sub-par one. To help you imagine what a day full of quick meals would look like, here are a few examples to get you started. Breakfast can be an egg-white frittata with a handful of spinach and mushrooms added with a bit of yogurt. Lunch could include: a hearty chunk of whole grain bread, feta or some other kind of cheese, some tomato slices, and a handful of greens drizzled in olive oil with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Finish lunch off with a mid-day dessert of seasonal fruit. This meal is quick, fresh, and fulfilling without the inconveniences of waiting in a fast food drive-through lane and waiting for your order.

For dinner, make spaghetti or your favorite pasta recipe. A shredded carrot, a finely chopped green or red pepper, some mushrooms, and a handful of chopped spinach to your sauce makes an already tasty dinner sublime. These additions lend flavor, color, and nutrition to the meal. For an impromptu grilling party in the yard, focus on the uniquely smokey and caramelized flavors of grilled Mediterranean-style produce. Skewer thickly sliced onions, peppers, zucchinis, large mushrooms, eggplant, and tomatoes, add a drizzle of olive oil with some lemon juice, and grill. For some flare, add a few pieces of chicken or lamb to the shish kebabs. To finish, add a garnish of grated cheese, a splash of tomato sauce, or a few sun-dried tomatoes. Fish and broccoli drizzled with olive oil and a pinch of minced garlic, as well as a few flakes of red pepper to finish is another great idea. For dessert that keeps with the grilling theme, try a grilled banana. This already sweet fruit is made sweeter by the heat caramelizing its juices.

Add a daily salad to further enhance the benefits and flavors of your meal. Choose vinaigrette for a wide variety of flavors and as a healthier choice than dressing. For crunch, add some unconventional vegetables such as watercress and chives. A little dairy such as cottage cheese also goes a long way in flavor and a little extra protein. While raw garlic and onion is too strong for most people to handle, if finely minced or served as vinaigrette, garlic and onion will make an aromatic addition.

Even the Friday-night regular special of pizza can be converted into a tasty and healthy version. The difference is just a few swaps. Make your pizza with a thin, whole-grain crust and fresh tomato sauce. Load up the vegetables in either traditional or unconventional combos such as eggplant-zucchini or briefly sautéed garlic with broccoli. Reduce the cheese to just a sprinkle and in a low-fat variety. While pizza and spaghetti may not exactly come to mind when you think of the Mediterranean diet, it is really the spirit of the food that makes it Mediterranean. This means fresh, wholesome, and mostly produce when it comes to the ingredients of a meal.

Processing Olives For Olive Oil

Friday, February 21st, 2014 3:28pm

Here’s how to process olives for their oil…The fruits must be inspected for defects and sorted by how ripe they are. This is important because the ripeness of the fruit will determine how much acidity the oil has. Often debris (such as leaves and twigs) is often removed with blowers or done by hand. To prevent early fermentation and to condition the olives for oil extraction, the fruit must be milled within a few hours of being picked and no later than three days for optimum oil extraction.  Next, the olives are cleaned in a cold wash and allowed to dry.

The next step involves crushing the fruit in order to break up its tissues and aid in the easy release of the oil. Traditionally, the crushing was done with mechanical rollers. In modern times, the crushers also rub and cut the fruit while crushing it.  Although the modern method works faster, it tends to allow tiny metal pieces to get into the oil. Once the fruit has been crushed, it is then ground—including the pit—into a paste to allow the oil to freely flow.  The first cold press of the olive oil (which requires only a minimal amount of pressure) involves spreading the paste onto stacked mats that will be smashed in a vertical press.

Another, more modern cold press process involves using a centrifuge.  After the paste is made, the paste is placed into the centrifuge and spun at an incredibly fast speed to remove the pulp from the oil. The resulting oil from this method or the traditional method will be a red-tinted mix of oil and water. The old process manually separated the oil from the water, but the more modern process uses another centrifuge to separate them. It is determined that five kilos of olive oil produces a liter of oil when pressed.

At this stage, the resulting oil is still not properly filtered. The smoky oil is stored in a container until time to be filtered. There are two chief ways in which the oil can be filtered. The more traditional approach allows the sediment to settle at the bottom of the container as the temperature warms up in the springtime. The more modern approach actually involves filtering the oil. It is said the more traditional approach produces oil with a smoother taste. It doesn’t really matter which way is primarily done because the resulting oil is still considered to be “virgin” olive oil. When olive oil is considered “pure,” the oil undergoes a second press (and sometimes more than that) before being filtered.  In Europe, pure olive oil is simply known as olive oil, and the oil doesn’t get the name “extra virgin” unless it has an acidity of at least 0.21%. The acidity of olive oil can be no more than 1.5% acidity because the potential for the oil to become toxic tends to increase with the increase of the oil’s acidity. You can also hot press—hot water press—the olive oil paste and add solvents in it to make soap (or use it for other commercial purposes). The oily vegetable sediment from pressing the olives can also be recycled as fuel, fertilizer, and cattle food.

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